Is Chad Just Ahead of the Curve?

On my way to the office this morning, I was listening (as usual) to the commercials on ESPN Radio Mike & Mike in the Morning. I was just getting in when they started talking about Chad Ochocinco and his promise to tweet during games. Having already heard Golic jump on Chad’s nads on the subject, I was prepared for yet another “blah-blah-blah-Chad-the-distraction-yadda-yadda-yadda and we’ll have more people you don’t give a crap about on the Subway Fresh Take Hotline right after you listen to the same recorded Sportscenter you heard every three minutes for the last hour this is Mike & Mike in the Morning ESPN Radio” segment.

Did I mention I hate sports radio? Of course, the only alternative is the local “Morning Zoo” or “Jack.” I should really invest in a CD player. Or more specifically, a car with a CD player. But I digress.

Anyhow, instead of the usual palaver, Greenie actually brought up something I hadn’t considered (first time for everything (OK, I’ll stop now)). He sourced the insight to someone else (no surprise (I was kidding)), who pointed out that Twittering from the sidelines or the locker room is only the logical extension of what already goes on. Coaches and players do sideline and halftime interviews during the games. Guys are “miked up” on Monday Night Football. Reporters prowl the sidelines during games gathering information from coaches and players that they feed back to the broadcast booth.

So, what’s so wrong with tweeting? If some assistant equipment manager is there with a cell when Chad comes off the field, asks what happens, 85 says, “I got held,” and the guy posts it, well, isn’t that the kind of thing we want to know, when we want to know it? Isn’t that, in fact, the kind of thing we’ll probably see on sports reporters’ tweets during the season?

Maybe it’s still not a good idea, and my vote went for “Twitter sucks” anyhow, but I think Chad might just be ahead of the pack on this one. We’ll see.

Topics: Chad Ochocinco, Twitter

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  • Mike

    Does all this really matter? Golic said in that video that Chad would be tweeting about what everyone just saw on tv, and that it would be ridiculous to do that. Well, what Golic is overlooking, if Chad was allowed to do this, we would get his point of view of a play, or a bad call, or what he’s pumped up about, or what he’s upset about…..ladies and gentlemen, what it all comes down to, is….Chad is an adult. Yes….an Adult. He is allowed to make his own decisions. As long as he’s not tweeting something offensive or the Bengals play book, who cares?!?!? Obviously Chad thrives on the camera and his fans…..what do you think would happen if everyone stood up and supported him? I bet we’d be fuel for the fire. This is what I have to say to Chad….”Tweet away….Tweet all day long….Tweet Tweet Tweet….. Carry a cell phone on the field and tweet after you score a TD on the Steelers (or atleast act like you are….(that could be your new dance with props)….either way, I’ll still be a Bengals Fan. Who Dey!”

  • COB

    What’s wrong with it, from the NFL’s perspective, is that tweeting from the sidelines goes outside their media stream. They pay the players to produce on the field. Then the NFL sells the rights to broadcast the games. All the player interviews, sideline reporters, players miked up, etc.? All that stuff goes through the NFL’s media stream. All those things are broadcast by the entities that pay the NFL for the rights, and thus all those things enhance the value of the product, and thus raise the value of what the NFL has to sell to FOX or ESPN, or whoever. Players start tweeting from the sidelines and that info stream outside of the NFL’s media stream will actually detract from the value of the NFL’s product. It will probably violate the contract the NFL has with their broadcast partners, as there is likely lots of lawyer talk giving them exclusivity and sole broadcast rights, etc.

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  • Mike

    see, thats where u and i differ. i dont think it would take money from the nfl and the nfl sponsors. i think it will bring more people to football, or it will atleast bring current football fans closer and interested. by controlling the media in which the fans want to interact with their product, the nfl is just hurting itself. look at it this way, do you see music artists requiring their fans to only be able to listen to their music in a single medium? no, because they dont want to limit the possible fans.

  • david

    Sorry, COB, I’m not buying it. Plenty of media who don’t pay a dime for rights to talk about the NFL — magazines and newspapers, for example — already exist. And through their own live blogs and tweets they are already doing the same thing Chad would be, except he cuts out the middleman. And they hardly detract from the value of the game. If anything, they drive even more interest.

  • Timzilla

    The only thing Chad is ahead of the curve on is Selfishness and Stupidity.

  • Mike

    Timzilla….definitely, I agree…..if he was to twitter during a game, it would be selfish and stupid. But, he is an adult, the NFL has to stop trying to control every aspect of their athletes lives. If Chad wants to twitter to his fans, and take the chance of losing fans (because some will think he’s not putting full attention to the game), that’s his decision, not ours or the NFL’s. I feel he does this because it pumps him up, that’s Chad, that’s what he does. If other players have a problem with what he’s doing, they need to worry about themselves and what they’re doing, not Chad. Let Chad be Chad.

  • Timzilla

    But Mike, on Sundays from 1p to 4:30 Chad is working, getting paid more than you and I can even image. Whether you’re a receptionist getting paid $100 a day, or Chad getting a $1 million per day, work is work, and he should be focused on the game, his job … not playing on his iPhone, showing off. I assume your boss wouldn’t want you Twittering while on the clock, would he?

  • Mike

    Tim, right….if his bosses (NFL) ask him to not twitter, he should not twitter, out of respect for his bosses, but, that does not mean he/we always have to agree with our bosses decisions.
    All I’m saying is, Chad should not twitter during a game if the NFL is asking him not to, but, I think it’s just hurting the NFL. It will draw the fans closer to the sport.
    Anyway, who am I to say twittering during a game is a distraction to Chad. Maybe that’s how Chad deals with things mentally. Who knows what goes on in Chads mind, not me, not you, not the NFL….only Chad.
    What it comes down to is how well Chad performs on the field. If Chad was twittering during a game and raking up the TD’s, no one would say it is a distraction. But, if he has a bad year, then it is a distraction.
    I hope Chad twitters his way to the Pro Bowl.
    WHO DEY!!!!

  • Timzilla

    Mike, you may be right, Chad might be able to Twitter, and it not be a distraction to him … but what about teammates? That whole argument aside, what kind of precedent is this setting? Do you want the TV cameras to scan the sideline and see 20 players Twittering? How about 30 players? The whole team? Both teams? Do you want Chad Tweeting direct messages to his NFL pals or his agent while the WR coach is trying to hold a meeting about the next drive? And what next … will Chad eventually want to use his cell phone video camera to shoot video of himself on the sideline bragging about making a catch, and then uploading it YouTube? And how long would it be before Chad Tweeted something derogatory about a teammate, e.g., complaining he was open and Palmer three it elsewhere? Don’t you see the Pandora’s Box this opens up? … turning the NFL into to a carnival sideshow.

  • Mike

    All I’m saying is, leave him be…..If the NFL wants to control every little aspect of the athletes lives, they will look foolish and controlling.
    And I bet most teammates don’t care what he does as long as he produces on the field. You never really heard anything from teammates a couple years back when he was doing awesome. I mean, they may have said something about it, but, it never reached the hype it is now. It was only the last couple years since he hasn’t done well and he kept doing the TD celebrations when teammates and fans really stood out and complained. Everyone seems to love his antics when he’s doing well, but, when he’s not doing well, everyone hates it.
    Chad is just a fun loving guy, he takes this sport seriously, but likes to have fun at the same time. Atleast thats my take on him.

  • Timzilla

    Mike, my guess is you don’t have people that work or report to you, cuz if you did the idea of them playing on the computer during work hours would anger you. And requiring that employees not Twitter during work hours is hardly controlling their lives. I suspect Chad is the most hated guy on the team. Did you notice last year that no teammates really came to his defense when fans and media turned on him. That was quite telling. The whole Twittering during games is an absolutely ridiculous notion, and will never happen.

  • david

    As someone who has been in the “boss” seat with people working for/reporting to me, my $0.02 is simply this: if Chad is out there making plays, I don’t care if he’s on the sideline doing the dirty deed with the cheerleading squad during the game, or twittering, or dressing like cookie monster, or playing Xbox, or anything else.

    If he’s not getting it done on the field, no sideline shennigans. It’s just that simple.

    BTW, thanks for all the comments while I have been way, you guys rock.

  • Timzilla

    Okay, how do you define “making plays”? First game of the season, Chad has 5 catches for 48 yards, no TDs. Is that making plays? After going 5-48-0, is Chad permitted to Twitter the second game? And what if Coles decides he too wants to play on Twitter during games; Game 1 Coles has 7 catches, 95 yards, 1 TD? Are both players permitted or not permitted to play on Twitter during Game 2? And Whitworth also decides he wants in on the action … during Game 1, he gives up 2 sacks of Palmer … is he permitted to Twitter during Game 2? Then Palmer wants in, too … first game he goes 14-28-1-1, they lose in OT, 31-28. Is Palmer allowed to Twitter in Game 2? So tell me exactly how you plan to define the minimum play-making achievement standards for each position to retain their Twittering rights for the following week?

  • COB

    Dave,

    I see your point, other media are reporting on the games. But broadcasting the goings on are the sole province of the NFL. If Chad wants to write a column on Monday, fine. But to broadcast his own commentary during the game? I suspect it would violate the NFL’s contract with their broadcasting partners, though I have no proof of that.