Bengals News

All-Time Top 5: Bengals Head Coaches

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4 of 5

2. Sam Wyche (1984 – 91)

Wyche was another coach that learned under the tutelage of Paul Brown. He was known as an emotional head coach that bonded with his players very well. Wyche was one of the great offensive minds of coaching during his tenure with the Bengals. He was famous for having over 12 men in the huddle on offense only to have some of them run off the field just before the snap to confuse opposing defenses (the NFL has since outlawed this and Wyche is a big reason for doing so). He was also the first to develop the no-huddle offense and he ran it very successfully.

Wyche is also famous for some of his antics during football games. In one instance, the Bengals were playing at home against the Seahawks and the referees made a call that was very unfavorable toward the Bengals. The crowd, in disgust of the call, started throwing beer bottles on the field and at the refs and Seahawks players. Wyche was handed the fields’ microphone and asked to calm down the crowd. This is what he said:

"Will the next person that sees anybody throw anything on to this field, point ‘em out, and get ‘em outta here. You don’t live in Cleveland – you live in Cincinnati!"

Like Forrest Gregg, Wyche also led a dynamic Bengals offense to a 12-4 record and a Super Bowl appearance, largely because of his highly developed and gifted players. These included quarterback Boomer Esiason, wide receiver Eddie Brown, tight end Rodney Holman, and fullback Ickey Woods. Also, like Gregg, Wyche was bested again by the same San Francisco 49ers. During Wyches reign as the Bengals head coach, he led the team to two division championships and two playoff births over his 8 years. Wyche’s term ended on a sour note when new Bengals president, Mike Brown wanted a change of direction only 3 years after the Super Bowl appearance. Brown says that Wyche resigned and Wyche says that Brown fired him to this day. Wyche’s overall record with the Bengals was 61-66.

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