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Cincinnati Bengals: Paul Brown Stadium Changes

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Jan 5, 2014; Cincinnati, OH, USA; General view of Paul Brown Stadium and downtown Cincinnati skyline during the opening kickoff the 2013 AFC wild card playoff football game between the San Diego Chargers and the Cincinnati Bengals. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Throughout the offseason, the Cincinnati Bengals have been busy making changes to their roster, playbook, and scheme. But the X’s and O’s aren’t the only thing Cincinnati is overhauling.  The Bengals have been busy updating the nearly 15-year-old Paul Brown Stadium. When the stadium opened its doors for the first time in Week Two of the 2000 NFL season, it was state of the art. In 2000, Paul Brown Stadium offered all of the modern amenities one could ever expect.

Since then, times have changed and technology has certainly advanced. Also, other stadiums have been built, so the Bengals can use those blueprints to update their own by bringing modern technology to the Queen City. Over the past six months, the Bengals have been busily building away and the fruits of that labor are starting to pay off.

The Bengals have completely renovated their weight room, adding more machines, and more specialized equipment. They’ve also added an indoor training area with artificial turf, so players can do more football related activities indoors, and not always have to be outside on the practice field. This is all well and good for players, but where do the fans benefit?

Ownership knows that part of this transition means involving fans more than ever before. What is the incentive for coming to a game when there is high definition television and a lifted blackout rule? Well, for starters, fans can enjoy a new bar at the east end of the stadium and destination stations where fans can enjoy a drink and updated WiFi. Concession stands are being upgraded as well with new menus and an easier to read format.

The biggest improvement to Paul Brown Stadium will be the scoreboard. The main scoreboard has been replaced with brand new, high definition, 4,680 square foot state of the art board. From here, fans will not miss a moment of any replay on a screen that is nearly 40% larger than its predecessor. All of these things equal one amazing fan experience at Paul Brown Stadium in 2015.

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