Cincinnati Bengals Draft Spotlight: Corey Coleman vs. Josh Doctson

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Nov 14, 2015; Waco, TX, USA; Baylor Bears wide receiver Corey Coleman (1) warms up prior to facing the Oklahoma Sooners at McLane Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports
Nov 14, 2015; Waco, TX, USA; Baylor Bears wide receiver Corey Coleman (1) warms up prior to facing the Oklahoma Sooners at McLane Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports /
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After losing Marvin Jones and Muhamed Sanu to free agency, the Cincinnati Bengals signed former Patriots’ wide receiver Brandon LaFell. Even with the signing of LaFell, the Bengals still have a need at WR.  The Bengals will have to look toward this year’s draft to upgrade the receiver position.

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With that being said, it is highly likely that the top rated receiver, Laquon Treadwell, won’t be available at time of the 24th pick. The next two guys on most draft boards are Corey Coleman and Josh Doctson, so we will take a look at each of them.

Josh Doctson, TCU

Oct 3, 2015; Fort Worth, TX, USA; Texas Christian University Horned Frogs wide receiver Josh Doctson (9) attempts to make a catch against the University of Texas Longhorns in the second quarter at Amon G. Carter Stadium. The pass was incomplete. Mandatory Credit: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 3, 2015; Fort Worth, TX, USA; Texas Christian University Horned Frogs wide receiver Josh Doctson (9) attempts to make a catch against the University of Texas Longhorns in the second quarter at Amon G. Carter Stadium. The pass was incomplete. Mandatory Credit: Erich Schlegel-USA TODAY Sports /

Josh Doctson is my second highest rated receiver on this year’s board, just slightly above Corey Coleman. One of the reasons behind that is Doctson has better measurables than Coleman, as he is 6’2″ 200 lbs with 32″ arms, 10″ hands, and a huge catch radius. He plays a style that would fit in with the Bengal’s offense best, as he can stretch the field and has deep threat written all over him. He would be an excellent complement to A.J. Green. He is a little slower than Coleman (4.5 40), but can still stretch the field with the best of them. To throw a comparison into the discussion, Doctson reminds me of a poor man’s Jordy Nelson, with the combination of size, speed, and his catching ability.

Corey Coleman, Baylor

Nov 21, 2015; Stillwater, OK, USA; Baylor Bears wide receiver Corey Coleman (1) runs the ball in the second quarter against the Oklahoma State Cowboys at Boone Pickens Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports
Nov 21, 2015; Stillwater, OK, USA; Baylor Bears wide receiver Corey Coleman (1) runs the ball in the second quarter against the Oklahoma State Cowboys at Boone Pickens Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports /

Corey Coleman is just below Doctson on my draft board this year, and one of the few reasons is his size. He is listed at 5’11” 190 lbs, and has 30″ arms. Coleman plays a bit of a different game than Doctson,  as he plays the middle of the field better, and is better underneath than Doctson. Coleman also offers the ability to return punts, and be very dangerous while doing it. His speed is the most dangerous part of his game (4.37 40), as defenses will be overwhelmed on just how fast he actually is. He is more suited to play the slot, but will be able to play the second outside man as well. To play the comparison game again, NFL scouts compare Coleman to John Brown of the Arizona Cardinals. Like Brown, both guys play the slot well, and can be dangerous on special teams. Coleman would fit in well enough to merit a draft pick, but Doctson would coincide with AJ Green and Tyler Eifert better.

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